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Trendelenberg Positioning Technique, An Alternative to Preloading for prevention of Hypotension during Spinal Anaesthesia for Abdominal Hysterectomy

Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Health Sciences,2013,3,3,743-747.
Published:August 2013
Type:Research Articles
Authors:
Author(s) affiliations:

Anil Kumar Verma1, Sangeeta Arya2, Vaibhav Shahi3,*

1Assistant Professor, Department of Anesthesiology, GSVM Medical College, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh. 

2Assistant Professor, Department of Obs and Gynae, GSVM Medical College, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh.

3Senior Resident, Department of Anesthesiology, SGRRIM&HS, Dehradun. 

Abstract:

Aims: The study was undertaken to search for an alternative technique to preloading with less or no side effects. Settings and Design: A total of 100 female patients of ASA class I and II undergoing abdominal hysterectomy were enrolled in the study. Two groups namely Group A and Group B were made. All the patients received 2.6ml of 0.5% Bupivacaine heavy intrathecally at L3-L4 level in lateral decubitus using 25 gauge Quincke's spinal needle. Patients of Group A were placed in Trendelenberg position after spinal anesthesia and patients of Group B received preloading with Lactated Ringer's solution before spinal anaesthesia. Assessment of hemodynamics (intraoperative and post operative) and side effects was done. Statistics: Data are expressed as mean + SD. Group comparisons were made using unpaired t-test. Results: Intraoperative blood loss and intraoperative requirement of Inj. Mephentermine was significantly less in Group A in comparison to Group B. Conclusion: Trendelenberg positioning after spinal anesthesia could be advantageous in terms of intraoperative vasopressor requirement and introperative blood loss.

Graph showing percentage of hypotension, urinary retension & nausea, vomiting in study groups